Netanyahu Calls for Jews to Immigrate to Israel

A steady stream of Jewish people have returned to their ancestral homeland since the beginning of the 20th century. But more still need to return. The times we are living in a the days of Prophecy for the fulfillment of the Redemption of Israel and those who battle along side her.But these days begin in darkness with evil trying to overcome light and hope. Following the shooting dead of a Danish Jew outside a Copenhagen synagogue on Sunday, the Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, has urged European Jews to immigrate to Israel.

Netanyahu announced the government will discuss Sunday a $46 million plan to encourage Jewish migration from Belgium, France and Ukraine and said at the start of a cabinet meeting that Israel is the home of all Jews.

“Extremist Islamic terrorism has struck Europe again… Jews have been murdered again on European soil only because they were Jews,”…”Israel is your home. We are preparing and calling for the absorption of mass immigration from Europe,” and Jews wherever they may be: ‘Israel is the home of every Jew… Israel awaits you with open arms,” he said.

“Europe is waking up to a new era, a new reality, to which we in Israel and around the Jewish world have been pointing out for the last 10 years. We are witnessing a rise of anti-Semitic attacks and expressions,” expert on anti-Semitism from the World Zionist organization Eitan Uri Bakhar told RT.

At the annual Taglit-Birthright ‘Mega Event’ in Israel, Netanyahu asked thousands of participants to hold a minute of silence for the victims of the attacks at the offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, in which 12 people were killed, and later at a kosher supermarket in the French capital in which four Jewish men were murdered, among them Yoav Hattab. The young Tunisian Jew had visited Israel with Birthright, the program that brings Jewish 18-to-26-year-olds on free 10-day trips, just a few short weeks ago.

“Tonight, I call on all of you, and on all young Jews around the world: Come to Israel, Make aliya. This is your country. This is your birthright,” the prime minister urged.

11  And it shall come to pass in that day, that the Lord shall set his hand again the second time, to recover the remnant of his people, which shall be left, from Assyria, and from Egypt, and from Pathros, and from Cush, and from Elam, and from Shinar, and from Hamath, and from the islands of the sea. 12  And he shall set up an ensign for the nations, and shall assemble the outcasts of Israel, and gather together the dispersed of Judah from the four corners of the earth. (Yeshayahu 11:11-12)

 

 

 

 

 

The Jerusalem Massacre

1prayingrabbiIt is hard to form the words to express the deep angst felt by such a horrific senseless act as was perpetrated by two Palestinians on praying Jews in their own synagogue.We here at Calling Israel/Israel in Prophecy pray for the healing of those families whose loved one were murdered while worshiping God. Four of those were rabbis, three of which were American. Our Presidents response was  weak and he couched his words in Moral equivalency – treating the Palestinians as victims in this monstrous attack which was promoted by Abbas. The following article was written by Rabbi Benjamin Blech: [Published: November 18, 2014 by Aish.com]

Death is a misfortune. Murder is far more horrible to bear. Turned into a massacre, it shocks us into unmitigated grief.

But there was still more to the terrorist attack of this week in Israel. It happened in the holy city of Jerusalem, a place in which we are meant to feel the nearness of God. It took place in a synagogue attended by early-morning worshipers who came only to stand in the presence of the Almighty and worship the Creator of the universe.

It was carried out by those who brought axes, knives and weapons of violence into the house of God.

The victims were in the midst of the silent prayer, reverently reciting words that dream of peace, as well as the hope for a messianic time when all people dwell together in brotherhood and tranquility. They wore the phylacteries, tefillin, signs of God’s closeness to our hands and our minds. Garbed in their prayer shawls they were brutally executed by those for whom their very holiness proved provocative.

Could there be anything more horrible than this?

Palestinian Response

Yet we need to weep bitter tears for another tragedy of comparable magnitude. It is the tragedy of the aftermath – the tragedy that illustrates the true horror of a crime that makes us question the right of mankind to call itself civilized.

To start, there was the response of the Arab world with whom we keep being challenged to make peace – as if we were the ones waging wars meant to annihilate us and refusing even to recognize us. No sooner did the news of the massacre become public than the Arab street began to joyously pass out sweets to their children and offer praise for the “glorious martyrs” who carried out the gruesome bloodbath. Murder of innocents needs no justification; when the victims are Jews it is a time for rejoicing.

Abbas warned not to allow Jews to “contaminate” the Temple Mount.

There was the response of Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas, whose name rarely appears in the media without the prefix “moderate,” who gave the pro forma required regrets to the English-speaking world – while at the same time, to his own people, praising those who carried out the violence against Jews for which he has been loudly agitating these past months.

Abbas also made certain to demand an end to the “Israeli provocations” that he made clear are the cause of all Palestinian uprisings. Just a few days ago he warned that he and fellow Palestinians would not allow Jews to “contaminate” the Temple Mount, adding that allowing Jewish prayer at the site would result in a global “religious war.” For the “moderate” Abbas, Jews dare not pray on the Temple Mount – or for that matter in any synagogue – with hope for safety and survival.

There was the response of Tawfik Tirawi, former chief of the Palestinian General Security in the West Bank and a member of Fatah’s Central Committee, who told a radio station that the attack was “nothing but a reaction to the recent crimes of the occupation and the settlers in occupied Jerusalem and across the nation.”

There was the response of Hamas, with whom humanitarians round the world demonstrated in solidarity this past summer, who in a message published on its official website, Al-Resalah, called the synagogue slaughter “a quality development in fighting the occupation” (i.e. the nonexistent occupation in Gaza) and declared: “We highly value the heroism of its operatives.”

Hamas spokesman Sami Abu Zuhri praised the attack on Qatari news channel Al-Jazeera as “heroic,” calling for more attacks of the same sort to “stop the occupation’s aggression against Islamic holy places.”

There was the response of the media which continued the kind of “balanced reporting” we were treated to this past summer when Israel struggle to defend itself against rocket attacks around the country. BBC led the news with the headline “Jerusalem police fatally shoot two after apparent synagogue attack.” The four murdered rabbis were apparently not worthy of mention.

CNN’s headline (after first calling it an attack on a “mosque”), “Four Israelis, 2 Palestinians killed in synagogue attack, Israeli police say,” left the reader to wonder whether two Palestinians were also the victims of the attack, giving moral equivalence to the terrorists and their victims.

Waiting in Vain

Far more significantly than all the above was the response from those in the forefront of criticism of Israel; from those urging the boycott of the Jewish state; from those marching in the streets of Europe because of their profound sensitivity to the plight of Palestinians; from those who ostensibly cannot keep silent in the face of injustice.

With the world’s silence, the hypocrisy is revealed.

And what was their response? What was their reaction to an unprovoked slaying of rabbis with the words of God on their lips?

We wait – and we wait in vain for any outcry. But now we know. The hypocrisy is clearly revealed. It has never been about compassion for innocent Palestinians. That was merely a camouflage for anti-Semitism. The world’s silence is simple. The horrific murders in Jerusalem have stirred no demonstrations, inspired no revulsion, caused no governments to denounce Arab terror.

The aftermath of the carnage makes me weep most of all – to cry for a world that still does not understand that – in failing to properly mourn for murdered Jews – it sows the seeds of its own destruction.