Jerusalem is Jewish

While we have spent some time speaking about the upcoming US Presidential Elections and other matters relating to it it, we are a blog about Israel in Prophecy (past & present) and that is our primary focus.  But we feel that cover America politics is an important part of the picture given the past relationship that Israel and the USA have had.   And since the election of Barak Obama, that relationship has been stressed, almost to the limit.  As an American, however, I am appalled at the hard line that the Obama Regime has taken against HaShem’s anointed people and especially against the Land and the Eternal City – Jerusalem.

This vile man, our president would give the heritage of Israel to those who regularly defile it and themselves.  There are many reports of riots at the mosque on the Temple Mount, some which have been documented and reported by Israel in Prophecy.  Most of those who express sympathy for the Palestinian cause, have never met a real Palestinian and their support is based on a misguided emotional appeal based on Media lies and half-truths.  Having visited Israel in 2010 during Pesach, I came into contact with many Palestinians.  I did not stay in the normal accommodations that tourists frequent but chose to stay in the Shomron area ( ancient Samaria) at Karnei Shomron.   This afforded me the opportunity to see and visit various Jewish and Palestinian towns in the area.  After spending almost 3 weeks there, I reached a interesting conclusion based on what I saw.   While I met many different Palestinians, both decent folks and haters, this was not unusual.  This could be said of countless races and ethnicities.  The revelation for me was how they treated the land.   There was a stark contrast between Jewish homes and villages and Palestinian ones, sometimes just over the hill.  Everywhere in the Shomron and Judea, Jewish homes and villages, no matter how old or how new bore the signs of life.  Jews of Samaria and Judea always kept there villages clean and welcoming.  There were always trees, flowers and bushes of all types being planted.  Even the home of a so-called settler who had only a tent to live in, planted saplings and flowers around his property.  By contrast, Palestinian villages and homes were dingy, with little effort to plant trees, flowers, bushes or to make the area warm and inviting.

This one thing shows who the real owners of Israel are.  Every landlord knows most tenant don’t or won’t care for their property the way they themselves would.  As landowners we are continually trying to improve our property – to make it warm and inviting, a place one would call home.

To my brother Jews and Israelis I would remind you that while our repressive government would see your heritage given to a base and undeserving people, individual Americans of many backgrounds and stripes are supportive of your righteous struggle to regain all of your biblical heritage including every inch of Judea and Samaria.  Many of us acknowledge that Jerusalem is the eternal capital of the Jewish state and will be the capital of the regathered 12 tribe nation under a Davidic king in the future.  As a Jew my heart yearns for a Jerusalem where all people’s, but especially Jews, may pray on the Temple Mount where there will be a rebuilt Temple – a House of Prayer for all Peoples.  As Jews, we have a God-ordained right to the Temple Mount, which was and still is the spiritual center of Judaism.

The follow article by Eli Hertz is a reminder of the place Jerusalem holds in the heart of a Jew:

“Jerusalem, wrote historian Martin Gilbert, is not a ‘mere’ city. “It holds the central spiritual and physical place in the history of the Jews as a people.”

For more than 3,000 years, the Jewish people have looked to Jerusalem as their spiritual, political, and historical capital, even when they did not physically rule over the city. Throughout its long history, Jerusalem has served, and still serves, as the political capital of only one nation – the one belonging to the Jews. Its prominence in Jewish history began in 1004 BCE, when King David declared the city the capital of the first Jewish kingdom. David’s successor and son, King Solomon, built the First Temple there, according to the Bible, as a holy place to worship the Almighty. Unfortunately, history would not be kind to the Jewish people. Four hundred and ten years after King Solomon completed construction of Jerusalem, the Babylonians (early ancestors to today’s Iraqis) seized and destroyed the city, forcing the Jews into exile. [end of article]

Fifty years later, the Jews, or Israelites as they were called, were permitted to return after Persia (present-day Iran) conquered Babylon. The Jews’ first order of business was to reclaim Jerusalem as their capital and rebuild the Holy Temple, recorded in history as the Second Temple.

Jerusalem was more than the Jewish kingdom’s political capital – it was a spiritual beacon. During the First and Second Temple periods, Jews throughout the kingdom would travel to Jerusalem three times yearly for the pilgrimages of the Jewish holy days of Sukkot, Passover, and Shavuot, until the Roman Empire destroyed the Second Temple in 70 CE and ended Jewish sovereignty over Jerusalem for the next 2,000 years. Despite that fate, Jews never relinquished their bond to Jerusalem or, for that matter, to Eretz Yisrael, the Land of Israel.

No matter where Jews lived throughout the world for those two millennia, their thoughts and prayers were directed toward Jerusalem. Even today, whether in Israel, the United States or anywhere else, Jewish ritual practice, holiday celebration and life-cycle events include recognition of Jerusalem as a core element of the Jewish experience. Consider that:

•         Jews in prayer always turn toward Jerusalem.

•         Arks (the sacred chests) that hold Torah scrolls in synagogues throughout the world face Jerusalem.

•         Jews end Passover Seders each year with the words: “Next year in Jerusalem”; the same words are pronounced at the end of Yom Kippur, the most solemn day of the Jewish year.

•         A three-week moratorium on weddings in the summer recalls the breaching of the walls of Jerusalem by the Babylonian army in 586 BCE. That period culminates in a special day of mourning – Tisha B’Av (the 9th day of the Hebrew month Av) – commemorating the destruction of both the First and Second Temples.

•         Jewish wedding ceremonies – joyous occasions, are marked by sorrow over the loss of Jerusalem. The groom recites a biblical verse from the Babylonian Exile: “If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning,”and breaks a glass in commemoration of the destruction of the Temples.

Even body language, often said to tell volumes about a person, reflects the importance of Jerusalem to Jews as a people and, arguably, the lower priority the city holds for Muslims:

•         When Jews pray they face Jerusalem; in Jerusalem Israelis pray facing the Temple Mount.

•         When Muslims pray, they face Mecca; in Jerusalem Muslims pray with their backs to the city.

•         Even at burial, a Muslim face, is turned toward Mecca.

Finally, consider the number of times ‘Jerusalem’ is mentioned in the two religions’ holy books:

•         The Old Testament mentions ‘Jerusalem’ 349 times. Zion, another name for ‘Jerusalem,’ is mentioned 108 times.

•         The Quran never mentions Jerusalem – not even once.

Even when others controlled Jerusalem, Jews maintained a physical presence in the city, despite being persecuted and impoverished. Before the advent of modern Zionism in the 1880s, Jews were moved by a form of religious Zionism to live in the Holy Land, settling particularly in four holy cities: Safed, Tiberias, Hebron, and most importantly – Jerusalem. Consequently, Jews constituted a majority of the city’s population for generations. In 1898, “In this City of the Jews, where the Jewish population outnumbers all others three to one …” Jews constituted 75 percent of the Old City population in what Secretary-General Kofi Annan called ‘East Jerusalem.’ In 1914, when the Ottoman Turks ruled the city, 45,000 Jews made up a majority of the 65,000 residents. And at the time of Israeli statehood in 1948, 100,000 Jews lived in the city, compared to only 65,000 Arabs. Prior to unification, Jordanian-controlled ‘East Jerusalem’ was a mere 6 square kilometers, compared to 38 square kilometers on the ‘Jewish side.’

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